Creating unique relationships between land and sky

Artists

Patrick Dougherty

Patrick Dougherty

Photo: Just For Looks, 2006. Max Azria Melrose Boutique, Los Angeles, CA. David Calicchio

As one of today’s most admired living sculptors, Patrick Dougherty composes with nature—wielding saplings and sticks to build monumental structures that echo, play and tussle with the land. Dougherty has literally worked with nature at Tippet Rise, crafting a new sculpture from local willows. Partially enclosed and protected from the Montana elements by a replica frontier-period schoolhouse, Dougherty’s piece seeks to embody the fundamental connection between art and nature. Learn more at www.stickwork.net.

Stephen Talasnik

Stephen Talasnik

With ongoing installations around the world, sculptor Stephen Talasnik describes himself as a structural artist. Inherently site specific, he draws inspiration from imaginary architectural model structures, which he materializes into natural sculptures that fold into and accentuate the contours of the surrounding landscape. At Tippet Rise, Talasnik is planning a series of nomadic wooden compositions throughout the land that converse with each other, creating an itinerary and study of art through nature. Learn more at www.stephentalasnik.com.

Mark di Suvero

Mark di Suvero

Widely recognized as one of the most influential artists of his generation to emerge from the abstract expressionist era, Mark di Suvero revolutionized the world of sculpture and profoundly influenced fields such as modernist architecture, design and land art. His large scale steel sculptures, breaking away from the walls of museums, are meant to be experienced outside. His work transcends time and space, opening ideas about the relationship between art and nature. Tippet Rise is proud to present di Suvero’s ‘Beethoven’s Quartet’, chosen for its connection with the composer’s seminal work. Juxtaposed against the Beartooth Mountains, the piece offers viewers a dialogue of Titans, between Earth and Sky. Learn more at www.spacetimecc.com.

Ensamble Studio

Ensamble Studio

Partners Antón García-Abril and Débora Mesa lead the team at Ensamble Studio that blurs the lines between land, art, architecture, structure and sculpture. Using raw materials, their work transcends architectural boundaries and time periods to produce a pure and direct emotional impact. At Tippet Rise, Ensamble will create structures cast from the land that guide and inspire visitors in their exploration of the land. Equal parts shelter, sculpture and landscape, the structures will emerge from the earth on a large scale, like a visceral manifestation of nature. Their primitive quality, rawness and geological expression inspire a fascinating exchange with the natural surroundings. Learn more at www.ensamble.info.

Alexander Calder

Alexander Calder

Sandy Calder was a cheerful, delightful child who never grew up and who became one of America’s great sculptors by giving parties in Paris in the 20’s where he manipulated his small circus animals made from wire. Like Feynman, play was the road he took to insight. When he showed up at Harvard by himself, student organizers wanted to know where his exhibition was. “It’s here,” he said, taking two rolls of wire out of his jacket pockets.

Calder often said he used the solar system as the basis for his hanging mobiles, even if the figures sometimes were animals.
Calder rejected his earlier motorized models in favor of more natural suspensions that moved in the wind, turning his back on industrialization, as have Di Suvero, Talasnik, and Ensamble.

A large Calder hung over Cathy’s living room as a child, and she was given a small Calder when she was born. Calder also painted wonderful colorful circles, one of which we’ve lived with for many years.